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Adding value to animal protein

Ideas listing

11 Ideas
39 Votes
34 Comments
25 Participants


What ideas do you have to create short- and long-term change to add-value to our animal production systems?

We want to hear from as many people as possible to source fresh ideas and perspectives . We want to hear challenges to established concepts, as well as explore early-stage ideas.

Questions to explore include how can we:

  1. develop or deploy new technology platforms for the animal protein industry;
  2. build value-adding capability along the value chain;
  3. identify market opportunities for new products; and
  4. find creative re-uses of food that would otherwise go to waste?


Challenge closes Monday 13 December 2021

Please find our Participant Information Sheet below (click 'more details') for further information regarding your participation in this challenge project.

 

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Idea thumbnail

When a BAD pest turns GOOD. Helicoverpa convert cotton to protein

Let’s take the once maligned cotton pest Helicoverpa and resurrect it to help save us from drowning in an ocean of discarded cotton waste and material. High in protein Helicoverpa can be reared at scale on artificial diets so the next step is to try producing them using cotton trash? Hang on but I thought cotton was a natural fibre that biodegrades, is recyclable and renewable? Yes, but at various points along the production process from cotton growing to the cotton T-shirt...

1 Score
Comments 1
Idea thumbnail

Skins, Scales, Heads to Tails

By 2050 the world population will put enormous pressure on the food sector and together with the impact of climate change, food options may be limited. 70% of fish become byproducts of the fisheries and aquaculture industries.  There are many products of human grade quality that can be retrieved from this waste.  Together with underutilised fish species  there are considerable protein alternatives that can be offered which will take pressure of the current protein producers.

3 Score
Comments 6
Idea thumbnail
Great problem articulation

Sustainable seafood packaging solutions

The idea of purchasing a seafood item from a sustainable and accredited source or production facility is tantalising (and often delicious), however, the romance is short lived when you arrive home and have to attack a plastic wrapping with a chainsaw. The plastics used in the packaging of seafood is at times a Neanderthal solution. If bought fresh from a deli it, is often double or triple wrapped in plastic coated paper and plastic bags.  I would propose that any packaging facility update...

1 Score
Comments 1
Idea thumbnail
Solution-focus

A pinker shade of pale.

Health concerns about red meat are two-fold, first the consumption of saturated fats and second the concern about haem as a carcinogen. Whilst fat can be trimmed, or removed via the cooking process, haem is more difficult to deal with. Most of the haem in vertebrate muscle tissue is present as a component of myoglobin. Myoglobin provides red meat with its deep red colour. Until the late 1900s myoglobin was thought to be an essential gene, transporting oxygen donated from blood...

2 Score
Comments 2
Idea thumbnail
Solution-focus

Food grade fish mince - a new sustainable high quality versatile protein source

There is much to be said about the health benefits of eating seafood, rich in digestible protein, long-chain omega 3, certain vitamins and minerals, but the Australian population lags greatly the rest of the globe when it comes to fish consumption (~13kg/ind./year vs 20kg/ind./year globally https://www.awe.gov.au/abares/research-topics/fisheries/fisheries-and-aquaculture-statistics/seafood-consumption ). Is this due to the fact that fish is generally expensive, and/or not as versatile as...

8 Score
Comments 4
Idea thumbnail
Great problem articulation

Chilled-out cows!

Regardless of how you view it, stressed-out cows pose a big problem. Not only can stress contribute to lower beef quality, but it can greatly affect an animal's overall quality of life. All in all, stress represents a critical aspect of animal welfare. Given the enviornmental stressors that affect cattle and the different experiences livestock face at different life stages and different places (e.g., at feedlots, pastures, in transit, etc. etc.), the need to influence production practices...

3 Score
Comments 2
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Thanks for your idea!

Provenance- track and trace where your animal protein comes from.

How can we mitigate data sharing obstacles in order to track and trace animal protein from farm (or pond) to table? How can we minimize fraud, optimize exports and increase trust in the Australian supply chain though provenance?

2 Score
Comments 3
Idea thumbnail
Collaboration opportunity

Make waste valuable again: food for circular aquaculture

Through the advancement and availablity of bioconversion technologies such as fermentation, insect and bioactive extraction, there is greater opporutnity to utilise waste, specifically from agriculture, and reuse it for food production. For aquaculture, there is an onging need to obtain sustainable, novel and readily available ingredients to feed fish and prawns. To align the aquauclture need with the 'nutrient supply' required the developement of a network between the waste producers,...

4 Score
Comments 1
Idea thumbnail
Collaboration opportunity

Beyond fish sticks: adding-value to farmed fish by market and product diversification

The range of fish-based foods in retail is somewhat limited compared to other parts of the world. I don’t want to get into the merit of why, but instead, propose the diversification of farmed fish products in retail. We all love fish sticks, but it would be nice to have more options! This idea aims to get insights on how to expand the diversity of farmed fish products in retail. I encourage you to share your thoughts thanks. 

3 Score
Comments 4
Idea thumbnail
Sparking ideas!

Iron supplement from beef blood

Producing a dry red blood cells powder that could be made into an iron tablets where the iron is bioavailable. One in three women in the world have iron deficiency. Red blood cells are high in iron and more bioavailable than traditional iron tablets. There is opportunity to collect the blood hygienically from Australian abattoirs, separate the red blood cells and dry them into a powder to form iron tablets. This will add value to what is currently a "waste" product. For proof of concept of...

7 Score
Comments 7
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